Proactive Network Configuration Validation with Batfish – NANOG (2015) Presentation

Proactive Network Configuration Validation with Batfish

Batfish is an open-source network configuration analysis tool in active development produced jointly by researchers at University of California, Los Angeles; University of Southern California; and Microsoft Research. Though its individual modules have various applications, its primary purpose is to detect bugs in network configurations. Batfish takes as input a set of network configurations, and an environment, which consists of a set of (in)active links and a set of external BGP advertisements. Users are able to ask customized queries about the control plane using Batfish’s domain-specific query language e.g. whether all loopback addresses are being advertised into OSPF, or whether all route policies attached to eBGP neighbors apply a particular community to incoming routes. Batfish also is able to compute the convergent data plane for a network, which provides further query facilities. Given the data plane, users can employ an off-the-shelf data plane checker or use Batfish’s data-plane queries to check common properties such as reachability/black holes, loops, etc, as well as novel properties (introduced at NSDI’15) regarding equivalence of multipath routes, fault-tolerance, and unique delegation of customer address space, with more to come.

Git committer e-mail. Which t use ?

Podcast (7 October 2015) http://bikeshed.fm/35


“Do you use a private or work e-mail when pushing git commits to repositories.”

???

The question is worth asking yourself as it’s (also) ’bout attribution of work you have done in either a public (fx GitHub) or private (fx Internal) domain.

The use of .mailmap partially solves the issue if you have by accident used multiple e-mail addresses when pushing commits in the past. But¬†consider your opinion going forward…

“Do you stick with using one single e-mail of your own or the company provided one.”

???


Looking back myself I will probably (!) stick with using my own mail address for all git commits I do in the future. As attribution back to me becomes easier and the knack of using .mailmap will be (mostly) a thing of the past! (plus gitlab community edition does not yet support the .mailmap functionality!)